Artist Jolene Mackie

If you’re a collector of Canadian art, a Jolene Mackie piece is essential. Known for her robots, ships and moons in surreal and whimsical landscapes, you will see her work all over the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia’s interior.

Based in Kelowna, BC, Jolene graduated from the Emily Carr University in 2009 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. As a professional oil painter who exhibits across BC, her work is in private collections worldwide.

Jolene has always acknowledged the artist within. “I was raised with two very creative parents who instilled in me a love of making things. Some of my fondest memories are times when I would be alone in my bedroom, or spread out in the backyard with art materials, just playing and making art.”

Lucid, 2021, oil on panel, 10″ x 10″ (sold)

When she began making art professionally, Jolene struggled with imposter syndrome and often referred to herself as a ‘painter’ instead of an ‘artist’. “It has taken me time, but the title of artist works much better to encapsulate the many facets of making art full-time. I’m not just a painter these days as my practice has expanded to printmaking, drawing, and collage.”

Proximity, 2020, oil on canvas, 12″ x 24″ (sold)

In Jolene’s world, the purpose of art has many layers. “For myself as an artist, creativity is a tool I use to try to understand myself and my place in the world. I have always found the act of creating to be meditative. When my hands and head are busy making decisions in the moment, I am pulled out of my worries about the past and future. I struggle with anxiety and depression, and I find my creative practice is something that helps me mitigate the side effects.”

Our own rainbow garden in the clouds, 2020, oil on canvas, 12″ x 12″ (sold)

The connectivity and relationships that Jolene builds through her art are very valuable to her. “By making honest work that speaks to me and my own interests and curiosities, I am finding my like-minded tribe in the world. I think art has so much power to remind us of our humanity, and to connect with each other.”

Day’s end, 2019, oil on canvas, 24″ x 48″

Jolene takes inspiration from the world around her, translating those moments and feelings into paint. “I am always inspired by the smallest things — shifting shadows, the shape of leaves, the colours in the clouds — and I try to bring how those moments feel into my work.”

Rouge, 2019, oil on canvas, 10″ x 20″ (sold)

Many of Jolene’s paintings depict a surreal dreamscape universe guided by a robot character. “I often get asked what the name of the character is, and his origin story. This character has been showing up in my sketchbooks for over a decade, and I decided to follow his adventures in paint! I personally love the ambiguity of the character. I love that viewers can bring their own narrative to each piece. I see this character as my muse. I think he is guiding me through these increasingly surreal other-worlds with a sense of curiosity and wonder.”

Daisy field, 2021, oil on panel, 6″ x 6″

Jolene can’t picture a life without creativity. “I keep a pretty consistent studio schedule for myself. I work 5 days a week in the studio developing my own work, or working on commission paintings for clients. I always have many projects on the go at different stages of completion. This way of working allows me to tap into whatever energy level I have each day: either a focused attention span to sit with one piece for many hours, or a more flighty attention span that loves to jump from piece to piece. I typically like to start my days with work that is easier to just dive into, like the prep work, or the varnish work that needs to be done. Once I have started, I find the momentum really helps me move into the more tedious and meticulous aspects of my work. I will most often tune into a podcast while I work, especially when I need to be still and focused. I find my music is great for more of the looser prep work!”

A lifetime of adventure, 2021, oil on canvas, 12″ x 12″ (sold)

When Jolene is away from the studio, she still finds herself working with her hands. “I love playing in my sketchbooks with watercolour paints and drawing materials. I also like gardening and roller-skating, which feels creative in a whole different way!”

Lost in this moment, 2020, oil on canvas, 24″ x 36″ (sold)

Teaching used to take up a good chunk of Jolene’s time and energy before March 2020. She was in the middle of an oil painting workshop which she had to postpone indefinitely. “I really miss teaching. It’s something that gets me out of the studio and sharing my passion with other people. I have found so much joy though this creative practice, and oil painting specifically, that I love sharing these tools with anyone who is interested. I love to host group workshops, but also work privately in my studio with individual artists on a weekly basis.”

Simple and quiet, 2018, oil on canvas, 12″ x 12″ (sold)

It has been over a year since Jolene has taught group classes. “I have considered transitioning to virtual classes, but paint is so tactile. I haven’t been able to figure out an online course that works for me yet. I love the ability to connect with a wider audience online, I just need to make sure I approach it in a way that is still wrapped up with my passion and love for the medium. I also think we learn so much from each other in a group setting, so at the moment I’m just waiting for a time that it is safe to continue with my teaching.”

Naramata Centre mural, 2021, inspired by their resident peacock, Kevin

Jolene loves the variety of opportunities that come her way through commissioned work. “The easiest and most fun projects for me are open-ended projects. I love when clients will peruse my website, tell me which pieces they love, what colour scheme and size they want, and leave most of the creation to me. I love working with people to make their vision come to life. For me, part of that is sharing the process of creation. I love taking process photos and videos that give clients a behind-the-scenes look at how their painting is built! However, I also love projects that challenge and push me outside of my comfort zone — that is where the growth happens. I’m lucky enough that I have the option to say no to any project that doesn’t feel right. What I love to do is to refer my artist friends. It’s awesome being part of such a diverse community of creatives in the Okanagan, because if someone comes to me seeking work that I don’t make, I have a wonderful roster of referrals for a variety of styles of work!”

Drift on, 2021, oil on panel, 6″ x 6″ (sold)

The pandemic has affected the way most people work, and it has definitely shifted Jolene’s work, too. “I have put more energy into my online platforms, and have been really enjoying the community on TikTok! I share my art videos, and have had the opportunity to ship originals and prints all across the continent. One element that has sprung up for me over the last year has been playing with holographic and colour-shifting pigment powders in my work. I have loved working with gold and silver leaf accents over the years, but have just this year learned how to incorporate a wide variety of pigment powders into my oil paintings. There is something about these shiny and eye-catching elements in an original work that really make it special when you see it in real life. I love when the work feels different depending on how the light catches it; there is something magical about it. When paired with my increasingly surreal imagery, I feel like these little details really make the work transcend reality.”

A moment just for you, 2021, oil on canvas, 30″ x 40″

While life has been unpredictable and no one can plan a direction with complete certainty, Jolene has goals and ideas that keep her going. “I have been renovating my studio in my home to work more efficiently, including an art storage area. I worked on a private mural this summer, and hope to create more public art going forward! In 2020, I installed a mural for the Vernon Public Art Gallery in their neighbouring parkade, and worked on a ‘Mini Mural’ exhibit at Cannery Brewing which was coordinated by the Penticton Art Gallery. I would also love to travel more with my work. 2019 took me to Chicago for my first international exhibit, and to Toronto for a painting competition. I miss those opportunities to explore the world and share my art. Fingers crossed that is in our near future!”

Jolene Mackie’s artwork at Karmyc Bazaar in Kelowna, BC

A rotating selection of Jolene Mackie’s artwork can be seen and purchased at Karmyc Bazaar in Kelowna, BC. Her work is also featured at the Tumbleweed Gallery in Penticton, at the Lovecraft Gallery in Tofino, and at Cannery Brewing in Penticton (mini mural project). You can also find Jolene’s original paintings, prints, calendars, necklaces and apparel in her online shop.

See more of Jolene Mackie’s art on her website at jolenemackie.com.
Follow her on Facebook at Jolene Mackie Art or on Instagram at jolene.mackie.art.


The banner image at the top of this page is a commissioned (sold) oil painting titled Wonderland, 2021, 48″ x 18″ by Jolene Mackie.

Buddy Canuck and the Canadian Only Team at Willow Beach

The Canadian Only team, influenced by silly ol’ Buddy Canuck‘s brilliant ideas, went along to Willow Beach in West Kelowna, BC, donning bunny ears and a duck hat for an Easter photo shoot.

“Those two ol’ stick-in-the-mud gals need a bit of fun in their lives,” says Buddy. “They’ll spend all day and night on their computers, growing the Canadian Only website, spreading the word about businesses left, right and centre. They need to get out for fresh air once in a while!”

The Canadian Only team: Annie, Buddy and Leslie

Founder and CEO, Leslie, is particularly camera shy.

“It’s like pulling teeth to get her in a photo,” continues Buddy. “Then, she still wants to cover her face completely. It’s not ’cause of the pandemic, either. No. She’d be hiding her facing no matter what,” Buddy continues to mutter under his breath: “I dunno what her problem is. I love showing up and shining for a photo op.”

Buddy Canuck is highly photogenic

Annie, the website and communications person on the team, is a bit more adventurous on a photo shoot, as evidenced by her choice of duck hat.

“If I can do something to make someone laugh, I’m all in,” says Annie.

And laugh they did. Passers-by chuckled and chortled as they walked past the photo shoot site and saw the three in a kerfuffle to produce some decent photos with a simple point-and-shoot camera on a self-timer.

“One day, we’ll be famous, and everyone’s gonna wanna take selfies with us!” says Buddy. Rest assured that his endearing trademark, his cheeky grin, is ever-present underneath his mask.

“That would be awesome,” Annie chimes in.

Leslie quietly hurries things along so she can get everyone back to the office, but Buddy lags behind and dawdles for a bit, seeing if he can balance on some rocks along the beach.

“Have a Happy Easter, everyone! Remember to have fun, make time for play, and eat at least one chocolate bunny!” is Buddy’s wise advice.

The Arts and Treasures at Karmyc Bazaar

In the heart of trendy Pandosy Village in Kelowna, BC, there’s a curious little shop that presents unique pieces sure to charm the eclectic taste! The owner of Karmyc Bazaar, Jennelle McGuire, invites you to “explore a visionary dreamscape” of artwork from well over 100 Canadian artists.

Jennelle McGuire, owner of Karmyc Bazaar
Jennelle McGuire, owner of Karmyc Bazaar

The shop’s name, Karmyc Bazaar, comes from a combination of Jennelle’s middle name (Karmin) and last name (McGuire), along with the concept of an open-air market or ‘bazaar’.

Karmyc Bazaar

Treasures include a plethora of original paintings, prints, jewellery, clothing, mixed media work, pottery, sculptures, artisan soaps and bath products, candles and more!

For a long time, Jennelle knew she wanted to be self-employed, but wasn’t sure exactly what that looked like.

“When I visited larger cities, I fell in love with the quirky, more ‘underground’ art displayed in these alternative galleries,” Jennelle recalls. “I’d get all inspired.”

Karmyc Bazaar

Coming home to the Okanagan, she noticed a few pockets of this kind of artwork, but “there wasn’t a space dedicated to showing it. I felt this was a niche that needed to be filled, so that was the start of Karmyc Bazaar.” The shop’s mission is to “encourage our community to reconnect with their inner selves through artwork and be inspired in their daily lives”.

Karmyc Bazaar

Being in the retail sector has had its challenges for everyone, everywhere, this past year.

“The pandemic has made the world of retail even more unpredictable, that’s for sure!” says Jennelle. “We moved locations in July 2020 and the reception of the community in Pandosy Village has been outstanding! We’re blessed to have a very supportive group of people cheering us on, whether through visiting us in-store, shopping online, or connecting with us via Instagram and Facebook. I am grateful for the support each and every day!”

Karmyc Bazaar at 2995 Pandosy Street in Kelowna, BC
Karmyc Bazaar at 2995 Pandosy Street in Kelowna, BC

It’s tough to say what the top selling items are, as the stock continuously shifts and changes.

“I’ll think I’ve just figured out what customers are drawn to, and then it changes,” laughs Jennelle. “Currently, I’ve noticed that we’re selling a lot of candles, bath products, and pottery. I think this is because a lot of us are spending more time at home and we want our spaces to feel nourishing and cozy.”

Karmyc Bazaar

Karmyc Bazaar currently works with 133 Artists from Vancouver all the way to New Brunswick!

“I’m always on the hunt for more talent to bring in,” says Jennelle. “Artists reach out to us, and I like to search for artists online. Word-of-mouth is always wonderful, too.”

Paintings from local artist, Jolene Mackie (at Karmyc Bazaar)
Paintings from local artist, Jolene Mackie

You can find the address and opening hours on the Karmyc Bazaar website, as well as their COVID-19 policy for in-store shopping and their online shop. (We actually prefer the online display via their Facebook shop, which will direct you to the website for your final purchase.) You can also find Karmyc Bazaar on Instagram.


Note from the author (Annie Zed): I’ve personally purchased many items from Karmyc Bazaar, for myself and as gifts for others (below are just a few)! My favourite purchases have been paintings by Jolene Mackie; plaques and ornaments by The Poppy Tree; cups and mugs by Tiny Cat Pottery; and paintings and quirky pieces by Rare Bird Art Studio.

Some pieces purchased from Karmyc Bazaar by Annie Zed

Creative Aging Awareness Day

Creative Aging Awareness Day was held at the Rotary Centre for the Arts (RCA) in Kelowna, BC on Friday June 20, 2014. Its mission was “A day-long celebration of your creative life to examine the role that creative expression can play in promoting engagement, healing and wellness for all ages.”

On the approach, I saw HeART Fit painters. HeART Fit is a free drop-in session of Spontaneous Process Painting every Tuesday at the RCA.

It was very busy inside with musical entertainment and creative arts filling the main floor.

The exhibits continued through to the back hall.

There was a weaving demonstration by the Ponderosa Spinners, Weavers & Fibre Artists.

Glass and metal artist Fay Wolfenden had a display of hand-made glass beads, jewellery and mosaics.

Lucie Parent demonstrated her Funky Fabric Sculptures made using Paverpol. She is a Certified Paverpol Instructor.

The Okanagan Quilter’s Guild seemed to be having a lot of fun.

Their display of Fibre Art Journals were especially intriguing.

Jill promoted Learning in Retirement programs.

There was information about the Sing for Your Life Foundation.

It was a busy and well-attended event with many inspiring creative organizations to follow up on!

Eileen Murray’s Mixed Media

Eileen Murray

On Friday June 6, 2014, Eileen Murray gave 2 workshops on “The Exploration of Incorporating Fabric, Yarn, Papers and Pouring Medium with Your Acrylic Paintings” at the Opus Art Supplies store in Kelowna. I was lucky enough to attend!

Eileen told us about a childhood experience that caused her to shut down creatively. She says we all have a similar story. In Grade 1, Eileen was ‘slammed’ by a teacher because she drew herself with blue hair. She was punished and this taught her that her art wasn’t good enough.

As an adult, she felt disconnected from her artistic side; yet she encouraged creativity in others and bought art supplies for her own children. Children are authentic when they play. “It’s like their soul is projected out into their art,” says Eileen.

Eileen studied Jungian psychology and dream imagery. It wasn’t until she took The Painting Experience course developed by Stewart Cubly that things changed. When she dismissed something that inspired her, she was told: “You are betraying yourself.” Eileen learned that one must dive into creative inspiration rather than run away from it.

Eileen showed us some of her artworks and what she did to achieve results, such as incorporating fabric and thread.

She showed us products that she used, such as glitter, and pouring medium with a resin-like effect.

She showed us the effect of applying bees wax.

And the tools to use with bees wax.

There was a draw for an opportunity to try this technique. Keith Routley won.

In just a few minutes Keith created this masterpiece.

Others were invited to try out the mixed media techniques.

A few people collaborated.

This resulted in a vibrant piece of artwork.

A whimsical piece was also created.

The workshop was very inspiring! I purchased a few products from Opus and have been experimenting with them at home ever since!

To find out more about Eileen Murray and her artwork, visit her website at eileenscreations.ca .

Kelowna MapleFest 2014

The Centre culturel francophone de l’Okanagan (CCFO) is a non-profit organization that promotes French language and culture appreciation in the Okanagan. It celebrated the 35th annual MapleFest in front of the Rotary Centre for the Arts in Kelowna on Saturday March 29, 2014.

There were elaborate chalk drawings on the sidewalks.

While maple flavours dominated, poutine was ever-popular.

Walking trees and other characters fascinated spectators of all ages.

All kinds of costumed characters pranced the grounds.

The Trips played some toe-tapping bluegrass tunes.

Ziggy created the most elaborate and artistic balloon animals.

A drumming group formed with djembes and hand percussion instruments.

Three times world champion hoop dancer, Alex Wells (Lil’Wat Nation) performed with students.

Chloé Gravel and Danielle sang well known songs in both French and English.

There was exercise-dancing and a couple of Mounties that joined in on the fun!

In the evening, Jann Arden performs at the Kelowna Community Theatre. Sunday brunch at the Laurel Packing House completes the festival activities.

 

Holistic Chamber of Commerce: Kelowna Grand Opening

Author Jo Dibblee speaks at the Holistic Chamber of Commerce Grand Opening

The Holistic Chamber of Commerce (HCC) – Kelowna branch celebrated its grand opening on Tuesday March 18, 2014 in downtown Kelowna. The 100% full-to-capacity venue, The Bohemian Café, was positively buzzing. President of the first branch in British Columbia, Andréa Dykstra, gave an introduction to the organization while holistic practitioners and business people mingled over a sumptuous spread of food and drinks.

Recognizing a need to unite ‘pockets’ of local holistic groups, Andréa brought the chapter to Kelowna to bring together people who can work towards a healthier community and planet. She believes that this organization can shift not just the lives of individuals and businesses, but also an entire community. Andréa’s vision is that through collaboration we can truly be the voice of change to lead to a more ‘whole-istic’ society.

The HCC is different from a traditional chamber of commerce because it considers being holistic first (members are reference-checked) and commercial second. With a meeting style more like a rotary or toastmasters group, the HCC supports members, extends its reach, and shares ways to make a living helping people.

I was drawn in by the keynote speaker, Jo Dibblee, internationally acclaimed author of Frock Off: Living Undisguised. Her wonderfully dynamic and inspiring talk began with a sharing of tragic detail in her tumultuous childhood. There was point and purpose to this. Jo says:

“No matter what happens to you, it does not define you.”

In her aim to survive the ordeals, she moved a lot and became adept at changing her look and her identity. What finally gave her the courage to step out and go public with her story?

“I learned you could be visible and invisible at the same time.”

Jo explained how we wear costumes, or ‘frocks’ to hide our fear. There are 4 frocks we all wear at one time or another: frocks of conformity, expectation, significance and connection. Engaging the audience, Jo asked us to share with someone next to us what frocks we had the greatest tendency to wear. Then Jo had us all stand in a proper pledge stance, left hand on heart, right hand held high, for the Frocklamation Declaration (three times, no less!):

“Frock off, ill-serving frock! Frock off!”

She ended the talk with the following.

“Let your life be your message
and your voice be strong.
Don frocks of compassion
so that others may not fall.
Don’t let others define you
toss those frocks away.
Instead,
take the life you’ve been given
and be in service today.”

After the talk, naturally gifted and self-taught musician/song-writer Eden DeBruin beautifully played guitar and sang a few tunes to entertain the crowd. And yes, there was even some dancing! With a desire to share his gift with the world in a bigger way, Eden is available for event bookings and can be contacted through Facebook.

Eden DeBruin

What I took away with me the most from the evening (all its participants and attendees were a great testament to this) was another of Jo Dibblee’s statements:

“Live your legacy today.”

You can apply for membership to the Holistic Chamber of Commerce by visiting the website (holisticchamberofcommerce.com).

Christian Lipani’s Resin Techniques at Opus

Today, artist Christian Lipani gave his third demonstration this month on resin techniques at Opus in Kelowna. Here, he worked on his painting, Archaeological Discoveries Number 3.

Bordering his painted wood box panel with tape, he mixes a 50/50 solution for a full minute and applies the resin with a foam brush. Ensuring the panel is flat with even coverage, he then hovers a torch over the surface to remove bubbles.

Christian reveals that he paints in series of 50 works. With a concept in mind, he develops each one further, sometimes experimenting with techniques. He also ‘exercises’ daily by sketching for about an hour each day. Often, these sketches develop into the basis for his larger works in acrylic.

While the resin is still malleable, Christian drags strategic lines in acrylic paint to further highlight aspects of the art.

Using his non-dominant (right) hand, Christian explains how he may ‘practice’ a swooping curve hovering above the artwork before actually touching the surface, in order to give the best chance for a perfect landing of what he has in mind. Here, he does just that, with a palette knife.

Moving in for a closer look, we see how Christian ‘engraves’ the resin around certain shapes as it is almost set.

Some of Christian’s other work was displayed in the room, such as Archaeological Discoveries Number 2 in this series, which does not have resin, but has a unique texture created with a palette knife.

In this painting, Christian used high flow acrylics with a needle-like tip.

This is a detail of a painting where Christian has engraved the resin extensively.

Nearer to the finish, Christian was still working on this number 3 in the series as we left the demonstration.

Christian Lipani immigrated to Canada from France in the 1960’s. He works in acrylic and resin on wood panels usually 3×4 feet and larger. He is also a sculptor. (One of his sculptures is pictured in the bottom left hand corner of the first photo at the top of this post.)

Christian has works in the New Moon Gallery and Hambleton Galleries in Kelowna. His work has been shown in Vancouver, Fort Nelson, Fort St John, and Theford Quebec. He has presented workshops in Kelowna, Victoria and Vancouver. Check the Opus website for his upcoming events.

Kelowna Christmas Show 2013

Kelowna Christmas Show 2013 at Prospera Place

The first day of the new annual Kelowna Christmas Show opened at Prospera Place today. Doors opened at 10:30 a.m., so I thought I’d mosey on over shortly after 11. The long line up to get in moved quickly. I got my hand stamped and found my way into the central arena. It was wall-to-wall people. Who knew it would attract such a crowd! Practically unable to move, I decided to come back later on in the afternoon. Good move, because at that time I was able to talk to a few very interesting vendors.

The first products to really catch my eye, were the beautiful dolls made by Yolanda Robinson.

Yolanda Robinson of Boom Boom Kids at the Kelowna Christmas Show, November 23, 2013

Not finding suitable dolls to purchase, she started making them for her own children.

Boom Boom Kids

Her children requested mermaid dolls that had legs, too, and could be played with as “land dolls” when the mermaid “tail” was removed. I thought this was a clever idea!

Boom Boom Kids

Yolanda’s website boomboomkids.com is under construction, but in the meantime, you can visit and “like” her facebook page, Boom Boom Kids. More cute pictures there, too!

It was a particularly cold day and I was drawn to this display.

Karren Ferreira of Knitz Specialty Yarn at the Kelowna Christmas Show, November 23, 2013

Karren Ferreira is a self-confessed Yarnaholic. She specializes in colourful scarf yarn made of mohair, wool and cotton with textures that are fuzzy, shiny or funky.

In addition to the fuzzy, compact and colourful scarves (above), Karren crochets practical all-in-one hooded scarves (below). Some are made with alpaca wool.

Karren’s selected yarns can be purchased on her Knitz Specialty Yarn website (knitzspecialtyyarn.com).

After having her own children, Alma Gurgol wanted to use cloth diapers.

Alma Gurgol of Ogobumz at the Kelowna Christmas Show, November 23, 2013

She began making them with a soft removable liner. She sells these and other baby accessories through her online shop, Ogobumz.

Cloth diapers at Ogobumz

Ruthy Penner upcycles fabric into the cutest little shoes and sundresses.

Ruthy Penner, "nooks", at the Kelowna Christmas Show, November 23, 2013

I asked if she had any with a Canadian design. These ones had a maple leaf button on them. Just a bit bigger, and they might have been good for Buddy Canuck! Check out the nooks website for more (nooksfootwear.com).

Mother Moon Designs also attracted a lot of attention with fleeces and home decor.

Mother Moon Designs

If any of these items catch your eye, you still have a chance to buy them in person at the Kelowna Christmas Show tomorrow, Sunday November 24, 2013 at Prospera Place, 1223 Water Street, Kelowna between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Culture Days in Kelowna

Culture Days is a coast-to-coast-to-coast event which raises awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of arts and culture in communities across Canada. Artists, organizations and community groups host fun and free activities, and all are welcome to attend. On September 28, 2013, I passed by the Kelowna Art Gallery and saw artists of all ages working on an outdoor masterpiece.

As I headed toward the library, I saw some yarn bombing.

And then, some more. It made me smile.

At the library, there was a talk about the Philippine Islands, with entertaining songs and dances followed by delicious Filipino snacks and beverages. There was a flower wreath dance that was particularly pretty.

In the evening, there was a Culture Days Jam held in the Mary Irwin Theatre at the Rotary Centre for the Arts. The first performance was by One Camel Short.

They play World Fusion style music. The band consists of (left to right): Murray MacDonald (guitar), Jim Copeman (frame drum and djembe), Nathaniel Huard (riq and bongos) and Richard Owings (violin).

The Great Way Martial Arts students had some outstanding moves, including leaps so high and too quick for my camera to catch!

The Jin Meng and OCCA Dance Star Program performances included graceful adults…

… and cute children in duck costumes!

The Mission Dance Centre put on quite an elaborate performance.

There was a lot happening on that stage.

Even flamenco dancers with castanets.

Ginger and Rose played guitar and sang a few folk tunes.

Chloé Gravel also played guitar and sang sweetly.

Yet another guitarist, Hammed Gahadd, sang with a wonderful falsetto.

Cherie Hanson recited a few of her own poems.

The evening ended with an energetic performance of Yamabiko Taiko Japanese drumming.

There were over 50 events in Kelowna alone, and I attended just these. It was an amazing array of talent. Look out for Culture Days next year, wherever in Canada you live!